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Bad future prospects for young people?



Bad future prospects for young people?


In the western developed countries there is a comparatively negative view of the future: only one in four Germans believes that today’s youth will have a better life than their parents. In France it is only seven percent. The younger population is similarly pessimistic about their future.

As a global survey by the market research institute Ipsos shows, the situation for the younger generation is largely assessed negatively in many countries. Only 20 percent of the British are optimistic about the future for young people, in Sweden and the USA the figure is 19 percent, in Spain 16 percent and in Belgium 13 percent. France brings up the rear with seven percent. In contrast, the majority of respondents in China (81 percent) are optimistic about the future of their children. Ipsos also found comparatively high values ​​in India (49 percent), Brazil (45 percent), Turkey (45 percent) and Russia (40 percent).

Only three out of ten young Germans believe in a better life

The younger generation in Western countries shares the negative view of the entire population. Only three in ten surveyed Germans under thirty believe that they will lead a better life than their parents. On average, four out of ten respondents think that they are better off than the elderly. In China, on the other hand, 78 percent of those under the age of thirty have a positive outlook on their future. In Brazil (49 percent), Turkey (47 percent) and India (46 percent), too, the number of young optimists predominates.

Most of the young negative thinkers come from Europe, which may be due to the still smoldering euro crisis. Only one in ten Belgians under the age of thirty sees their future life in a more positive direction than that of their parents. They share this view with the French (16 percent), Spanish (16 percent), Italians (21 percent) and the British (22 percent).

Make sacrifices for the next generation?

What needs to be done to enable youth to have a better life? Not even one in ten Germans thinks that the older generation should make sacrifices to help the young. This puts them well below the global average of 33 percent. This is in contrast to the Turkish population. Seven out of ten respondents expect sacrifice for their children to come. The Indians (50 percent), South Africans (44 percent) and Poles (43 percent) also largely share this view.

(Ipsos / asc)