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Force Touch technology could go much further and simulate the touch of different materials on the screen



Force Touch technology could go much further and simulate the touch of different materials on the screen


Apple patents a technology that uses vibrations and temperature changes to simulate on-screen materials

To detoxify a bit of the tons of information about the Apple Watch that has been appearing in recent days, we want to bring you a new patent from the company that will make us dream of technology that at the moment still seems too futuristic. What if we could feel the touch of different materials on the screen of our iPhone? Attention to what Apple has in hand.

The patent, titled “Material Simulation for Touch Surfaces,” takes the haptic interaction and current Force Touch technology of the Apple Watch and the new MacBook one step further. Based on the principles of haptic technology, the company describes a linear actuator capable of moving horizontally and vertically, or combine both, to create a unique vibrating sensation for the wearer’s finger.

Varying the intensity and amplitude of these vibrations in time and space can be achieved simulate rough or smooth surfaces depending on the effect we want to achieve. The patent also describes that the system could work in conjunction with capacitive, position and force sensors to detect the position and pressure level of the user’s finger.

Adding all this up, Apple ensures that it could be able to reproduce the sensation of different textures, surfaces and materials on the touch screen. For example, you might feel a rough sensation when sliding your finger across a picture of a tree trunk. However, perhaps the most interesting thing that is detailed in the patent is the possibility of play with the temperature through small thermoelectric coolers.

Apple could implement thermoelectric coolers to create unique sensations

Continuing with the previous example, this type of technology could make the sensation of touching a piece of wood on the screen completely different from touching a piece of cold steel. Undoubtedly, the possibilities that this would have in future applications would be unimaginable and would lead to a whole new type of interaction.

As noted in Appleinsider, those of Cupertino have begun to show a lot of interest in haptic technology in recent years, starting with the Apple Watch, continuing with the MacBook and rumors suggest that the iPhone 6s would be the next device to incorporate, although at a more advanced level.

What do you think of the patent? Can you imagine the possibilities that such a technology could have?