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What remains of the week: discount battles, chauvinism and download successes



What remains of the week: discount battles, chauvinism and download successes


The DIY chain Praktiker has created an advertising cult phrase with the advertising slogan “20 percent off everything – except pet food”. The origin of the claim was a competition law problem: The pet food had to be excluded from the discount campaign, as it would have fallen below the cost price at the time. The sentence was a success but also ruin for the hardware store chain. This week practitioners have to file for bankruptcy, the discount offers have ruined the company. Read more in our weekly review.

By Anne-Kathrin Keller

Broke of the week: Praktiker loses a discount battle

“20 percent on everything – except pet food” – hardly any other advertising slogan has caught on as well as Praktiker’s cult phrase. He burned his head. But even if the advertising recall is great, it does not help the company: This week Praktiker filed for bankruptcy due to overindebtedness and insolvency. The Aldi concept of being among the hardware stores did not work out. While the competitors Obi and Hornbach positioned themselves as high quality, Praktiker stuck to its cheap image. Although this kept sales high, profits could not be booked in this way. With smaller shops and a smaller range at the same time, Praktiker had some of the highest costs in the industry. The long winter and the resulting lack of income from the garden department finally gave Praktiker the rest. The cult advertising slogan “20 percent off everything – except pet food” was discontinued in 2011 by the marketing department, the associated strategy drove the company to bankruptcy until it finally became insolvent.

Advertising review of the week: ZDF angered viewers for the women’s soccer World Cup

Machos, chauvinists, misogynists – just three insults that ZDF had to endure this week. ZDF has drawn the ire of critics with a short commercial for the women’s soccer World Cup. A woman is not shown on the soccer field, but in the laundry room. The player dribbles down a cellar stairs in the gleaming white Germany jersey. The door of a washing machine is open, unerringly it shoots the dirty ball into the drum and presses the reader program. In the end it says: “Ball clean in Sweden – the Uefa women’s football championship on ZDF”. Women and washing – at Lerchenberg nobody seems to think beyond the cliché. The criticism is correspondingly great.

Here is the impetus for the criticism:

The highlights of the week on absatzwirtschaft.de:

>>> The media are perceived as more corrupt than the public administration

>>> Germans listen to the radio for more than three hours a day

>>> The unpredictable consumer ?!

>>> Wimbledon star Lisicki: Successful revival of tennis

Anniversary of the week: App Store celebrates five years

Apple’s App Store went online on July 10, 2008. Five years later, the App Store is at the heart of Apple’s mobile ecosystem with over 900,000 applications. The success story of the App Store almost never happened. Originally, iOS was designed as a closed system. It was only with the iPhone 3G that the company opened the operating system to app developers. This move has paid off for Apple. From January to March 2013, the iTunes / Software / Services division alone generated sales of over four billion US dollars. In total, more than 50 billion apps have now been downloaded from the store. As of May 2013, 50,000,000,000 apps had been downloaded. The most popular app categories are games, education, and entertainment.

Statista has shown the development graphically:

Illustration: Five Years of the App Store